Tempo Bioscience

The Challenges In Small Molecule Drug Development – Part I | Tempo Bioscience

The world of drug discovery is rife with new approaches within immunotherapy, personalized vaccines, microbiome therapies, and CRISPR-based therapies in an attempt to provide novel treatments and cures for a wide range of diseases, most often cancer. Despite progress in these areas, with FDA-approval granted for the first two CAR T-cell therapies in 2017, more than 90 % of the drugs currently available on the worldwide therapeutic market is comprised of small molecules. Image Credit: e-Magine Art (https://bit.ly/2Lnxjte)
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A multistressor world: marine climate change and its effects on ocean life

Coastal marine ecosystems represent the most diverse and productive parts of the world’s oceans, providing a range of crucial ecosystem services such as food, protection, and recreation to humankind. Unfortunately, coastal ecosystems are threatened due to marine climate change, marked by three related and concomitant oceanic changes: warming, acidification (increased carbon dioxide levels), and declining oxygen levels.
Tempo Bioscience

Macrophages and Microglia – Same but Different! (Part I) | Tempo Bioscience

For anyone who has studied biology, macrophages have most likely been on your reading list at one point or another. Microglia on the other hand are less likely to feature on your undergraduate syllabus (or else I’m older than I like to admit!). In this post, we introduce both cell types and point out their similarities and differences. Image Credit: Vall d'Hebron Institut de Recerca VHIR
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Uncovering new strategies to reduce TB susceptibility in HIV-infected individuals

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a serious cause of disease and mortality worldwide, especially in developing countries. Co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aggravates this situation, and puts intense pressure on national healthcare services in sub-Saharan Africa, where up to 80% of TB patients are HIV-infected, and where TB is now the leading cause of death in HIV-infected individuals.
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The Many Faces of Phagocytes | Tempo Bioscience

Most of us were introduced to phagocytosis as a cellular event where dead host cells, microbial cells or their components, or other foreign bodies are engulfed and often destroyed by specialized cells known as phagocytes. During my undergraduate studies, phagocytosis was a small topic within immunology and macrophages were the crème de la crème of phagocytes, patrolling the body’s tissues for foreign invaders, much like security guards patrolling their territories.
Tempo Bioscience

Can MSCs Become A New Treatment Option for Cancer? | Tempo Bioscience

Mesenchymal cells (MSCs) are rapidly gaining traction in cancer therapy. Although they are not the only stem cells with anti-cancer activity, MSCs are often preferred because of their low immunogenicity and inherent ability to migrate to tumor sites. So far, numerous attempts have been made to load MSCs with therapeutic proteins, oncolytic viruses, chemotherapeutic drugs or nanoparticles bearing anti-cancer drugs, with some very promising results. Let’s take a look at some of the advances in this area to date! Image Credit: londoncalling2001 (https://bit.ly/2JRWck4)
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Cancer Organoids – A New Era in Cancer Treatment | Tempo Bioscience

Image Credit: Lung-on-a-chip: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (https://bit.ly/2Jbv1Qg ) Cancer organoids are generated from cells donated by cancer patients. Their major applications lie in their potential to shed light on the processes of cancer development and metastasis, to help us understand heterogeneity within tumors via single cell sequencing, and to direct clinicians towards personalized cancer treatments based on patient-specific drug testing.
Tempo Bioscience

What’s All the Fuss About Organoids? | Tempo Bioscience

In the modern fast-paced worlds of research and medicine, disease models that take us closer to the real-life situation are highly desirable. While we can’t discredit the power of in vitro cell culture methods to provide important clues about biological processes, mechanisms of disease, and response to drugs, the availability of life-like tissue systems such as organoids provides obvious opportunities to study these aspects of human biology in a much more realistic manner. Image Credit: Yale Rosen (http://bit.ly/2I306Cf)
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